Getting Stuff Done: Getting Beyond Procrastination


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Procrastinators end up being the ones doing most of the work in the final week before a deadline. Other reasons cited on why students procrastinate include fear of failure and success, perfectionist expectations, as well as legitimate activities that may take precedence over school work, such as a job.

Procrastinators have been found to receive worse grades than non-procrastinators. Tice et al. The negative association between procrastination and academic performance is recurring and consistent. The students in the study not only received poor academic grades, but they also reported high levels of stress and poor self-health. Howell et al.


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In their study they identified two types of procrastination: the traditional procrastination which they denote as passive, and active procrastination where the person finds enjoyment of a goal-oriented activity only under pressure. The study calls this active procrastination positive procrastination, as it is a functioning state in a self-handicapping environment. In addition, it was observed that active procrastinators have more realistic perceptions of time and perceive more control over their time than passive procrastinators, which is considered a major differentiator between the two types.

Due to this observation, active procrastinators are much more similar to non-procrastinators as they have a better sense of purpose in their time use and possess efficient time-structuring behaviors. But surprisingly, active and passive procrastinators showed similar levels of academic performance. The population of the study was college students and the majority of the sample size were women and Asian in origin.

Comparisons with chronic pathological procrastination traits were avoided. Different findings emerge when observed and self-reported procrastination are compared. Steel et al. They also sought to measure this behavior objectively. A weighted average of the times at which each chapter quiz was finished formed the measure of observed procrastination, whilst observed irrationality was quantified with the number of practice exercises that were left uncompleted.

As such, self-reported measures of procrastination, on which the majority of the literature is based, may not be the most appropriate measure to use in all cases. It was also found that procrastination itself may not have contributed significantly to poorer grades. Procrastination is considerably more widespread in students than in the general population, with over 70 percent of students reporting procrastination for assignments at some point.

This study argues that academic misconduct can be seen as a means to cope with the negative consequences of academic procrastination such as performance impairment. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Main article: Perfectionism psychology. Akrasia Attention economy Attention management Avoidance coping Avoidant personality disorder Decision making Distraction Distributed Practice Dunning—Kruger effect Egosyntonic and egodystonic Emotional self-regulation Empathy gap Law of triviality Laziness Life skills Passive-aggressive behavior Postponement of affect Resistance creativity Restraint bias Tardiness vice Temporal motivation theory Time management Time perception Trait theory Work aversion Workaholism Writer's block Zeigarnik effect.

Kirst-Ashman; Grafton H. Hull, Jr. Cengage Learning. Current Psychology. New Brunswick, N. International Journal of Educational Psychology. Against the Gods: The remarkable story of risk. Psychology in the Schools. Business Insider. Retrieved Experimental Analysis Behav. Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior. Archived PDF from the original on Journal of College Student Development. January European Psychologist. Journal of Research in Personality.

Psychology in Russia: State of the Art. Journal of Educational Psychology.


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    Write them down as a list on a piece of paper. Focus on just getting that one small task or part of the big thing done. Then move on to the next. Change your beliefs The problems that repeatedly put you into a procrastinating state might disappear if you change your view on reality. Examine your beliefs. Ask yourself if you could see things in a more beneficial and effective way for yourself. Realise you can choose you beliefs about yourself and the world.

    More Books by Fred Gleeck

    The past is not the future. You are here right now and you choose and can change your habits. Make a small deal with yourself Here is an effective one I first heard from Ed Bliss well, actually now that I think about it I probably first heard it from a teacher back in school about ten years ago.


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    • It kinda rings a bell. After those 5 minutes you can do something else if you want to. But make a note on your schedule when you will come back to the task and work another 5 minutes with it. As Bliss notes, not matter how unpleasant a task may be, you can often talk yourself into working 5 minutes on it. And after that the next 5 minutes will feel even easier. Or maybe you raise the bar to 10 minutes of work. Getting some actual work done on that task, if only for 5 minutes, gives you a rush of exhilaration.

      How I Beat Procrastination - Robin Sharma

      Making a game out of how much work you can get done in those 5 minutes can also be a small but in its own way fun challenge. Great article! I am in support of everything you said, especially changing your beliefs.

      Manual Getting Stuff Done: Getting Beyond Procrastination

      So no expectancy times value divided by a temporal dimension time, which is made worse by impulsiveness. And it works really, really well for accounting almost every element and every intervention and every situation that we see for procrastination. So the procrastination equation determines our motivation to complete a task and the way the factors into that motivation are expectancy times value divided by impulsiveness, times delays, so expectancy I guess, is the perceived chance of us getting that reward or suffering that bad consequence for not doing a task, you multiply that by the value, which is the guess the size of the reward or size of the bad consequence.

      So you divide all that by that. So it sounds like can do different things to tweak your motivation. So you can increase expectancy or you can increase the value of the reward or you can focus on eliminating the downside. Or is this something that you you at best can just manage by tweaking certain few things? Where kind of want to beat it back down to the occasional thing. Brett McKay : That makes sense. The expectancy and value components, like what can we do with those things to cause us to, you know, More likely be motivated to start doing the thing we know we need to do. Piers Steele : All right.

      Well, they they actually somebody this is Alex Vermeer actually made an infographic about it. So you can think about well, when I procrastinate, what am I doing? Is it something on my phone?

      Getting Stuff Done: Getting Beyond Procrastination Getting Stuff Done: Getting Beyond Procrastination
      Getting Stuff Done: Getting Beyond Procrastination Getting Stuff Done: Getting Beyond Procrastination
      Getting Stuff Done: Getting Beyond Procrastination Getting Stuff Done: Getting Beyond Procrastination
      Getting Stuff Done: Getting Beyond Procrastination Getting Stuff Done: Getting Beyond Procrastination
      Getting Stuff Done: Getting Beyond Procrastination Getting Stuff Done: Getting Beyond Procrastination
      Getting Stuff Done: Getting Beyond Procrastination Getting Stuff Done: Getting Beyond Procrastination
      Getting Stuff Done: Getting Beyond Procrastination Getting Stuff Done: Getting Beyond Procrastination
      Getting Stuff Done: Getting Beyond Procrastination Getting Stuff Done: Getting Beyond Procrastination

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